Saucony Hurricane 24 Review: Category 5 Comfort?

The Saucony Hurricane 24.

All shoes are reviewed by the Fleet Feet tester team, which represents a wide variety of goals, foot shapes, running locations and terrains. Reviewers pound the pavement, climb the hills, tackle the trails, then come together to compare notes. Debates ensue over the feel of the cushioning, the purpose of the shoe, and how it compares to last year’s model. While each reviewer has their own individual preferences, we hope that capturing our debates will help you make an informed decision.

The NOAA has predicted an above-normal Atlantic hurricane season this year. Our first named storm to touch down has arrived - the Saucony Hurricane 24. But this hurricane didn’t leave flooded streets and downed power lines in its wake. Instead, it left me with a smile on my face running down the sunny streets of south Florida.

Maybe it’s true what they say about Floridians being built for hurricanes. Or maybe I enjoyed the Hurricane 24 so much because it’s a really exciting update. Read on to learn more about the Saucony Hurricane 24, available July 8, how it’s different from the previous versions and what the rest of our review team thought.

Tech Specs

Saucony Hurricane 24

Weight 9.8 oz (W), 10.6 oz (M)
Stack height (heel/forefoot) 38 mm/32 mm
Heel-to-toe drop 6 mm
Category Stability
Surface Road
Price $160
Comparable to... ASICS GEL-Kayano 31, HOKA Gaviota 5

Ride

Cushioning

Energy

Coming Soon

Hurricane 24 offers a trifecta of technologies

The Saucony Hurricane 24.

The Saucony Hurricane 24 combines two types of midsole foams–PWRRUN foam and PWRRUN PB foam–with Saucony’s new Center Path Technology, to create a comfortable, stable ride.

Think of Saucony’s PWRRUN foam like an economy seat on an airplane. It provides base-level comfort and it will get you where you need to go. But wait, Saucony Airways oversold their economy cabin and they need to upgrade someone to first class! This is where Saucony’s PWRRUN PB foam comes in. It’s softer, lighter and overall more comfortable (which is why it’s been making its way into more and more Saucony shoes).

When I put on the Hurricane 24, I enjoyed the first-class comfort of the PWRRUN PB foam right underfoot along with a broad base of PWRRUN foam that added structure and support.

I will admit, I was nervous to try these shoes because they’re categorized as stability. I really don’t do well in stability shoes, they typically make my feet and calves hurt from the lack of flexibility. However, with the recent innovations in stability technology, and after wearing the shoes to a physical therapy session (thanks to my left ankle) and the gym, I felt confident enough to take them out on a 6-mile easy run with strides. They felt fantastic!

There was plenty of cushioning to protect my feet from impact, and the midsole foam was the perfect balance of soft and firm. The midsole never felt super soft and squishy, but it also never felt harshly rigid. In fact, I kind of forgot all about the shoes and was just focused on my podcast (the latest episode of Crime Junkie), which is a tell-tale sign of comfortability.

Kate, who typically enjoys a balanced soft-to-firm ratio in her shoes, agrees.

“The Hurricane feels soft and thick on the run. I got a bit of that compressive feeling, but it’s not overly squishy,” she says. “It offers a lot of protection from the road and it’s comfortable for a variety of paces. I tend to prefer shoes that are cushioned but semi-firm, and I did really like the Hurricane overall. The thick cushioning feels especially great when bombing down a huge hill!”

Saucony uses their new Center Path Technology to guide your stride, which is made up of four key components:

  • A wide, broad platform offers a stable base for landings.
  • High sidewalls encompass your foot so you’re sitting inside the cushioning rather than on top of it.
  • An asymmetrical profile provides reinforcement by placing additional foam on the medial side of the shoe. This ensures the durability of the shoe for runners who overpronate.
  • A rocker shape and beveled heel guide you forward from landings to toe-offs

“I love how the stability features function in the Hurricane,” says Spencer, who runs exclusively in stability shoes. “The shoe provides a solid structure that I can depend on mile after mile. I never felt like I was heavily pronating in the shoe. Plus, the rocker shape of the midsole works really well to aid forward momentum. It keeps me going at the end of runs when my body begins tiring. I’m a big heel striker, and the shoe’s beveled heel helps to sustain my stride’s efficiency.”

The Saucony Hurricane 24.

Plush, premium upper gives off bougie vibes

The upper of the Saucony Hurricane 24 sends a loud and clear message about exactly what kind of shoe this is–a premium, max-cushioned stability trainer. The maximum comfort and cushion doesn’t stop at the midsole, it extends all the way up top with a luxuriously padded upper, heel collar and tongue.

Before reviewing this shoe, I didn't know much about the Saucony Hurricane model. We’ve never reviewed it, so I didn’t know what to expect. But when I slid the shoes on, I got an idea of where the Hurricane falls on the Saucony spectrum. The upper feels super plush and luxurious, so I got the feeling that this is the Cadillac of Saucony stability shoes.

The smooth material wraps comfortably around my foot and fits perfectly true to size. I didn’t need to tie the marathon loop and had no heel slippage. There’s a small pull tab on the back of the heel, but I didn't need to use it. My feet slipped easily inside the shoe. All in all, this fit was a ten out of ten.

“This shoe is luxuriously plush,” Kate agrees. “The tongue is cushy, the heel collar is padded, and everything rests on a tall, thick stack of foam.”

Kate, Spencer and I all found the Saucony Hurricane 24 to feel true to size despite having different foot shapes and widths. If you’re not sure about the shape of your feet, it’s a good idea to head into your local Fleet Feet. Fleet Feet outfitters use 3D fit id® foot scanning technology to gather information about your feet and the support they need by taking precise measurements of your foot length, width and arch height, so you can learn a lot about your feet while you’re there.

Saucony Hurricane 24 vs Saucony Hurricane 23

Tech Specs

Saucony Hurricane 24

Saucony Hurricane 23

Weight

9.8 oz (W), 10.6 oz (M)

9.9 oz (W), 11.4 oz (M)

Stack height

38 mm/32 mm

33.5 mm/25.5 mm

Heel-to-toe drop

6 mm

8 mm

Stability tech

Center Path Technology

TPU Guidance Frame

Price

$160

$160

The Saucony Hurricane 24 features a higher stack height, lower heel-to-toe drop, new stability technology and slightly lower weight than the previous version.

The Hurricane 24 uses PWRRUN PB foam to replace the PWRRUN+ foam used in the 23. The result is a lighter and more energetic ride. Plus, the latest version’s new Center Path Technology creates a more flexible ride while still offering the support runners want in a stability shoe.

Fleet Feet didn’t review the Hurricane 23, so we can’t say first hand how the two shoes compare. What we can say is that the Hurricane 24 combines all elements of a next-generation stability shoe: ample cushioning for underfoot protection, lightweight yet durable materials and a ride that feels both smooth and supportive.

The Saucony Hurricane 24.

How does the Saucony Hurricane 24 compare?

We took a look at some comparable models to see how they stack up against the Saucony Hurricane 24. Here’s what we found.

Tech Specs

Saucony Hurricane 24

ASICS GEL-Kayano 31

HOKA Gaviota 5

Weight

9.8 oz (W), 10.6 oz (M)

9.3 oz (W), 10.8 oz (M)

9.1 oz (W), 10.9 oz (M)

Stack height

38 mm/32 mm

39 mm/29 mm (W),

40 mm/30 mm (M)

34 mm/28 mm (W),

36 mm/30 mm (M)

Heel-to-toe drop

6 mm

10 mm

6 mm

Price

$160

$165

$175

Remember when I said the Saucony Hurricane felt like the Cadillac of Saucony stability shoes? The same can be said for the ASICS GEL-Kayano 31 and the HOKA Gaviota 5, which are each their respective brands' “upper echelon” of stability trainers.

All three shoes offer plenty of cushioning to absorb impact and new, innovative stability technology to support your stride.

The GEL-Kayano 31 uses ASICS’ 4D Guidance System, which uses many of the same aspects as Saucony’s Center Path Technology, including a wide, stable base and rounded heel bevel. The HOKA Gaviota 5 uses HOKA’s H-frame technology to support your feet on both the lateral and medial sides.

The shoe you prefer will likely come down to your individual preferences regarding fit and feel. Reviewers found that the Hurricane 24 falls somewhere in between the Kayano 31 and the Gaviota 5 when it comes to softness.

The outsole of the Saucony Hurricane 24.

Who is the Saucony Hurricane 24 best for?

Thanks to a thick, plush stack of PWRRUN PB foam and Saucony’s Center Path Technology, the Hurricane 24 is ideal for those seeking a well-cushioned trainer that provides gentle guidance for their stride.

However, if you aren’t used to running in shoes with a high stack height, Spencer notes that there may be an adjustment period in the Hurricane 24.

“With less responsiveness and ground contact than most footwear, it could take a few runs to fully feel balanced and in control,” he says. “If it were up to me, I would lower the shoe’s immense height. There were times when I didn’t feel completely balanced because of the elevation and rocker shape.”

I have to respectfully disagree and say that, while the 38-millimeter heel stack height does fall into the max-cushion category, it’s not any taller than other highly cushioned shoes on the market. At the end of the day, it all comes down to what feels comfortable for you.

Coming Soon

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