Mizuno Neo Vista Review

The Mizuno Neo Vista.

All shoes are reviewed by the Fleet Feet tester team, which represents a wide variety of goals, foot shapes, running locations and terrains. Reviewers pound the pavement, climb the hills, tackle the trails, then come together to compare notes. Debates ensue over the feel of the cushioning, the purpose of the shoe, and how it compares to last year’s model. While each reviewer has their own individual preferences, we hope that capturing our debates will help you make an informed decision.

If you’ve ever been hiking–or trail running–you know that the vista at the top makes the trek worthwhile. While the Mizuno Neo Vista is better for speedy road running than hiking or trail running, the name evokes feelings similar to those you’d get from a beautiful panoramic view of the mountains after a long journey.

With a soft, lightweight midsole foam, a glass-fiber infused nylon plate and a rocker shape, the Neo Vista certainly seems like a shoe that can do it all. But can the fit, feel and performance of the Mizuno Neo Vista live up to its name? We tested the shoe to find out–here’s our verdict.

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Tech Specs

Mizuno Neo Vista

Weight
Stack height (heel/forefoot)
Heel-to-toe drop
Category
Surface
Price
Comparable to…

Ride

Cushioning

Energy


As smooth as butter

The Mizuno Neo Vista.

Three key components combine in the Neo Vista to offer a deliciously smooth ride. First, Mizuno’s new midsole compound, Mizuno ENERZY NXT, offers a lightweight and responsive feel. The midsole foam surrounds a glass fiber-infused nylon plate, a classic Mizuno technology that compresses as you land and expands as you take off to return energy with each step. Last but not least is Mizuno’s Smooth Speed Assist technology, which refers to the shape of the sole. It’s angled to provide a gentle rocker shape, helping you run as efficiently as possible.

“The ride of the Neo Vista is as smooth as butter,” says Mandy, who’s training for an ultramarathon. “I love how the midsole feels under foot. It’s the perfect combination of squishy, peppy and comfort that pushes me forward and makes me want to run just a little farther and a little faster. I went out for a 5K for my first test run and ran another mile in them because my pace was faster than expected and I didn’t want the run to be done.”

Unfortunately, I haven’t gotten the chance to truly test these shoes as I’ve been dealing with an ankle injury. I did, however, walk around in them quite a bit (with a few strides thrown in because I couldn’t resist). The cushioning feels well-built and spongy, and I think it would feel super squishy if not for the nylon plate embedded in the midsole. The plate is the “it” factor of this shoe, elevating it from an energetic daily trainer to a true super shoe. Plus, the rocker shape adds an extra forward push to every stride. I’m really looking forward to getting back into a normal running routine so I can test these further.

Knit upper holds you in–whether you like it or not

The Mizuno Neo Vista sports a one-piece knit upper that wraps securely around your foot. I found the fit to be quite comfortable, but Mandy thought it was too tight.

One piece uppers can be tricky because they’re not as easy to manipulate in order to achieve the perfect fit. I usually find them to be much too loose on my feet, which is always a disappointment when I enjoy the shoe otherwise. I was pleasantly surprised by the fit of the Neo Vista–it wrapped perfectly around my foot with no excess room in the midfoot.

However, Mandy wasn’t a fan.

“My workout started just by trying to put these shoes on. I understand the performance fit aspect, but the sock-like upper felt super tight. I appreciated the heel loop in the back, because without it I’m not sure I would have been able to get the shoes on. They fit true to size in terms of length, but if you have high volume feet I’m not sure you would be comfortable in these shoes.”

High volume feet are feet that take up a lot of space within the shoe, and low volume feet take up less space. I have low volume feet, which is likely why I enjoyed the fit of the Neo Vista while Mandy didn’t.

If you aren’t sure about the volume, width or size of your feet, your best bet will be to head into your local Fleet Feet. Fleet Feet outfitters use 3D fit id® foot scanning technology to gather information about your feet and the support they need by taking precise measurements of your foot length, width and arch height, so you can learn a lot about your feet while you’re there.

Mizuno Neo Vista vs Mizuno Wave Rebellion Pro 2

Tech Specs

Mizuno Neo Vista

Mizuno Wave Rebellion Pro 2

Weight

7.8 oz (W), 9.4 oz (M)

6.3 oz (W), 7.6 oz (M)

Stack height

44.5 mm/36.5 mm

38 mm/36.5 mm

Heel-to-toe drop

8 mm

1.5 mm

Price

$180

$250

The Neo Vista is a completely new offering from Mizuno, but we couldn’t help comparing it to the Wave Rebellion Pro 2 that launched in January.

Mandy and I both loved the Rebellion Pro 2, so we were equally excited to try the Neo Vista.

While the Rebellion Pro 2 is a true racing shoe and the Neo Vista falls into a supertrainer category, both shoes combine snappy plates and peppy midsole foams to create energy return.

Both shoes have a distinct rocker shape, although it feels much more defined in the Wave Rebellion Pro 2 because of the shoe’s low heel-to-toe drop. The Neo Vista is quite a bit heavier than the Rebellion Pro 2 and also has much more cushioning.

The Mizuno Neo Vista.

How does the Mizuno Neo Vista compare?

We took a look at some comparable shoes to see how they stack up against the Mizuno Neo Vista. Here’s what we found.

Tech Specs

Mizuno Neo Vista

Saucony Endorphin Speed 4

New Balance SC Trainer v3

Weight

7.8 oz (W), 9.4 oz (M)

7.2 oz (W), 8.2 oz (M)

7.3 oz (W), 9.2 oz (M)

Stack height

44.5 mm/36.5 mm

36 mm/28 mm

40 mm/34 mm

Heel-to-toe drop

8 mm

8 mm

6 mm

Plate

Nylon

Nylon

Carbon-fiber

Price

$180

$170

$180

The Mizuno Neo Vista, the Saucony Endorphin Speed 4 and the New Balance SC Trainer v3 all offer lightweight, responsive rides thanks to bouncy midsole foams with plates embedded inside.

The Neo Vista has the tallest stack height of the three shoes, so it makes sense that it’s slightly heavier than the Endorphin Speed 4 and the SC Trainer v3. The biggest difference between the three shoes comes down to the soft-to-firm ratio of the midsoles and the fit of the uppers.

In my opinion, the Neo Vista is the softest of the three shoes, with the SC Trainer v3 following closely behind. It also has the most distinct upper, with the one-piece knit wraparound and the large heel pull tab in the back. All three shoes can handle a variety of paces and distances, so your preferred shoe will likely come down to individual preferences regarding fit and feel.

The Mizuno Neo Vista.

Who is the Mizuno Neo Vista best for?

The Mizuno Neo Vista will be enjoyed by runners who love a tall stack of energetic cushioning and a propulsive nylon plate. The biggest unknown variable will be the fit of the upper.

Mizuno claims the upper material is stretchy enough to accommodate a variety of foot shapes, and that was my initial assumption when testing the shoe. However, Mandy found the upper to be too tight, so it’s possible that it’s not a good fit for those with high volume feet despite the alleged stretchiness.

If you love the sound of Mizuno’s ENERZY NXT foam combined with a nylon plate, we recommend heading into your local Fleet Feet to try on the Neo Vista for yourself.

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